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Film grain
#51
I assume it's meant to be used on Log colourspaces?
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#52
Anything you want, works with davinci, fcpx, Adobe, everything.
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#53
Film Convert Pro really is amazing. I mentioned this in another thread as well, but thought I'd post it here too so that more eyes might see it. I work in vfx and we use it a ton. As Stamper already mentioned there are a lot of different options and it applies grain to the plate in the same way real grain would manifest on film.

Can't recommend it enough. I've used it in both After Effects and Nuke, but believe it also works in Resolve too. Could be wrong on that though.
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#54
Thinking of adding grain to the 35th Ann AAWIL using filmconvert in Premiere, does anyone know what the best settings would be for this film. Can't seem to find much info on filmstock etc outside of technicolor and what cameras were used to film it.
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#55
So since the blue channel has the most grain, how would one go about utilizing noise reduction on only the blue channel in avisynth? And if the source video is YUV, is there a way to do it without converting to RGB (since it will eventually be encoded with 4:2:0 YUV, so I'd like to avoid excessive color space conversions if possible).
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#56
You could just use normal noise reduction and then combine the blue channel from the result with the other channels from a milder denoise. But no, it won't be possible without a conversion to RGB and back, for obvious reasons. But you could use AviSynth+ and do the whole thing in 16 bit, to minimize loss.
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