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Idea Regraining Terminator 2! (Proof of concept/experiment)
#11
That's a good question. I admit I haven't really thought about that. Most reasonable would probably be the one from the negative if it was scanned from that - all else would kinda be fake as well.
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#12
Just try to get Film Convert Super 35 grain (ditch the color) it should accurately react to the footage and reproduce it exact grain.
You can also dial down the grain if it's too noisy. It's a one click job, you render and that's it. It's the closest you will get.
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#13
Adding back in some grain is a great idea, the DNR pass on the negative scans was extreme as was some of the sharpening.
Some guess work is in order as it will be impossible to sample the grain structure of the OCN.

Based on the look of your sample it looks more like an inter positive or inter-negative which would have been used for 35mm prints or Home Video Scans back in the day.
These are 1 or 2 generations from the negative and exhibit there own grain structures on top of the OCNs.

https://forum.fanres.com/thread-1415-pos...l#pid27927

Half the amount you have added in the setting's in nuke and have a look.
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#14
(2017-12-03, 10:31 AM)Stamper Wrote: Just try to get Film Convert Super 35 grain (ditch the color) it should accurately react to the footage and reproduce it exact grain.
You can also dial down the grain if it's too noisy. It's a one click job, you render and that's it. It's the closest you will get.

Yes. I believe the options he is using in Nuke are the same thing.
I use ReGrain in Magic Bullet Suite which is also the same method.
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#15
@TomArrow: your grain process adds some sharpening (like face) but blur others (like jacket); even if I must admit I like coarse grain, yours seems kinda "wrong" (it looks like DVD grain, with all its limitation due to lower resolution, MPEG2 encoding etc.)

@Synnove: I like your grain, but it's a bit faint (or too fine) for my taste! Wink

I thought to use the grain taken from Aliens BD (Cameron's most grainy film) and apply to T2; result is not that bad, but it would be interesting to see it in motion: http://screenshotcomparison.com/comparison/125373
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#16
I like it, Sporv. I wonder how would look Silberman's awful bulldog wrinkled face once regrained, in the Sarah 6-month review scene.
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#17
http://vfxvoice.com/converting-a-classic...-makeover/

Here's an article on the 3D process, shows a frame of the new scan before and after processing (degrain/sharpen) for 3D conversion. Here's an 'untouched' frame:

[Image: t2_01.jpg]
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#18
If someone could provide frame of the shot Beber wrote about, and the one zoidberg showed, I'll regrain them.
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#19
There you go:

https://img15.hostingpics.net/pics/83273...202914.jpg
https://img15.hostingpics.net/pics/56013...202805.jpg
https://image.noelshack.com/fichiers/201...-29-44.jpg
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#20
(2017-12-03, 07:49 PM)spoRv Wrote: @Synnove: I like your grain, but it's a bit faint (or too fine) for my taste! Wink

I thought to use the grain taken from Aliens BD (Cameron's most grainy film) and apply to T2; result is not that bad, but it would be interesting to see it in motion: http://screenshotcomparison.com/comparison/125373

The grain amount can be adjusted via the various nodes, and the size via the translation node.. Hard to gauge how much is appropriate without seeing it in motion.

What method are you using to combine your sources? It looks like you're getting grain on areas with zero information.
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