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Tool to undo improper image stabilization?
#1
Hi.

I have a short (40 seconds) animated clip which has been subjected by image stabilization (probably Youtube's), which has failed miserably. The image rotates and zooms in and out and is generally horrible to look at.

The clip is available here:
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B1VlH4...jl0RGFGLWc

I already have the background in good quality, so my hope is that it's possible to recreate the camera movements on the background, and copy the foreground element onto it. But first I need to undo the movement created by the attempted image stabilization.

There's a huge channel logo in the picture, and I do have a black frame where the full logo is positioned exactly where it's supposed to be. Is it possible to do a new image stabilization that focuses only on the logo, and moves, rotates and zooms every frame, so that the logo fits properly?

I only need the last 23 seconds of the clip, and it's mostly animated at 12fps, so it's probably less than 300 frames. I'm fine with manual labor too. If there's a tool that easily lets me move the frame along all three axes, and rotate it, using only the keyboard, I could probably make something that's "good enough" for my use.
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#2
Yes, I think it should be possible to stabilize on the logo for the most part, for example in After Effects, setting manual tracker points, then stabilizing with them. There are some short parts where the logo is almost completely hidden, those may be a challenge.

Assuming it was a normal stabilization using normal transforms (scale, rotation, position) without any "warp correction" (which would distort the frame in unpredictable ways).

But you will not get back the parts that were cropped out through the stabilization.

That said, it will probably not be perfect. The video is strongly compressed and thus the position of the logo contours may not be precise enough to give a completely satisfying result. Consider that you're trying to extrapolate the position/scaling/rotation of the image from a relatively small image portion. Any small error in that image portion will translate to a larger error in the complete image.
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#3
Did a quick test: https://mega.nz/#!Uvo0yYpT!g5FAeuYFoL4fN...X400MFJdBQ

Would need some more work invested and some of the errors corrected to make it truly worthwhile, but I think it can be done by anyone willing to invest the time.
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#4
(2018-03-09, 09:32 PM)TomArrow Wrote: Did a quick test: https://mega.nz/#!Uvo0yYpT!g5FAeuYFoL4fN...X400MFJdBQ

Would need some more work invested and some of the errors corrected to make it truly worthwhile, but I think it can be done by anyone willing to invest the time.

Nice. That's very promising. 

TomArrow Wrote:But you will not get back the parts that were cropped out through the stabilization.

That's OK. The idea is to mask out the background, and insert Jiminy into a better quality version of it, like this (I need to remove the blinking stars first, though).

[Image: Junglebook.jpg]
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#5
Oh ok - good luck! But I think Jiminy himself is a bit cropped in a few frames
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#6
Basically something like this:

[Image: Junglebook_composite.jpg]
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#7
That's interesting

Perspective is not a perfect match but you can probably tinker with it
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