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Disney+ Star Wars is 4K
#71
Although probable, there's no guarantee the UHD discs will be identical masters.
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#72
(2020-02-05, 11:42 PM)TomArrow Wrote: Although probable, there's no guarantee the UHD discs will be identical masters.

I'd say more than probable that they will and highly unlikely that they won't. Those 4K remasters were made under Lucas back in 2012-2013 or something, with 3D conversion in mind (that they never did because of lack of interest after The Phantom Menace 3D), before Disney bought Lucasfilm. Disney+ launched in October and the UHD discs will be released in March. I can't see where new masters could come from within 5 months...
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#73
Well they may not be entirely new, but there could be slight differences. Slightly different grading or stuff like that. You never know, studios do weird things sometimes.
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#74
(2020-02-06, 12:02 AM)TomArrow Wrote: Well they may not be entirely new, but there could be slight differences. Slightly different grading or stuff like that. You never know, studios do weird things sometimes.

Maybe. I heard some complaints about the HDR on Disney+. Some claim it's fake HDR, whatever that means. But even so, I don't see Disney putting more money into those when they'll ditch the physical media in the near future in favor of their subscription platform.
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#75
All fair arguments for sure.
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#76
Bits #4K Review – Bill Hunt spins George Lucas’ original Star Wars: A New Hope in Ultra HD from Disney and Lucasfilm!

“ Disney’s 4K disc presentation obviously includes all the latest tweaks and changes seen in the Disney+ version, but the image quality is superior in every respect. The average datarate is in the 60-70 Mbps range (vs 15-25 Mbps via streaming) and that extra bandwidth makes a huge difference. Detail is crisp and clean, apart from the occasional optical softness, with well refined fine detail and texturing. Photochemical grain is present but it’s very light. This is also a very restrained high dynamic range grade, which might surprise some people, but it means that the film’s original theatrical appearance is well maintained. Peak brightness is 1000 nits with a deep floor, so the shadows are inky-black while retaining nice detail. The 10-bit color adds genuinely impressive but subtle nuances to the film’s palette. Skin tones are natural, C-3PO’s gold plating has a rich luster, the sands of the Tatooine desert exhibit a greater variation that you’ll have appreciated before. It appears that some extra “film-look” processing has been done to the 1997 and 2004 Special Edition footage, so that while it’s still obviously of lesser resolution than the live action footage, the differences are a bit less glaring than they were on the previous Blu-ray release. This is, quite simply, the best this film has ever looked in the home.”

https://thedigitalbits.com/item/star-war...w-hope-uhd
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#77
Quick note if you've just got D+ like we have in the UK; Disney have disabled Dolby Atmos to reduce bandwidth usage during the corona virus outbreak.
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