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How to scan films that were released at 1.85:1 for the theater
#21
They've used the full width of the film in both versions just different vertical cropping to achieve 1.78:1 or 1.66:1.
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#22
(2021-09-11, 02:28 PM)Onti Wrote: Why isn't the 1.78:1 frame identical to the 1.66:1 frame but without the black bars?

Sorry but if you wanted the 1.78:1 to be identical to 1.66:1, you have to squeeze one vertically or horizontally to fill all the frame - in that case, why?

Personally, I prefer the bigger frame - talking about Gulliver, 1.66:1 - as it has more image top and bottom; of course the price to pay is to have it pillarbox. Others prefer to have the OAR (Original Aspect Ratio) - dunno in this case which is the right OAR.

The best option? Use the biggest aspect ratio and let the player overlay black bars to get OAR - but in Gulliver case, assuming 1.85:1 is the OAR (and I'm pretty sure it is not) it will end in windowboxed frame - pillarbox first, then letterbox on top of that...
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#23
(2021-09-11, 06:26 PM)spoRv Wrote:
(2021-09-11, 02:28 PM)Onti Wrote: Why isn't the 1.78:1 frame identical to the 1.66:1 frame but without the black bars?

Sorry but if you wanted the 1.78:1 to be identical to 1.66:1, you have to squeeze one vertically or horizontally to fill all the frame - in that case, why?

Personally, I prefer the bigger frame - talking about Gulliver, 1.66:1 - as it has more image top and bottom; of course the price to pay is to have it pillarbox. Others prefer to have the OAR (Original Aspect Ratio) - dunno in this case which is the right OAR.

The best option? Use the biggest aspect ratio and let the player overlay black bars to get OAR - but in Gulliver case, assuming 1.85:1 is the OAR (and I'm pretty sure it is not) it will end in windowboxed frame - pillarbox first, then letterbox on top of that...

Suppose we have a full frame scan and we want to crop for 1.78:1 and 1.66:1.

Let’s start, I drop the footage into my 1920x1080 timeline.

[Image: fVnXbgec_o.jpg]

The result, 1.78:1:

[Image: TpnwshWx_o.jpg]

Now, 1.66:1

[Image: pSaxN9dJ_o.png]

The result (black bars: left, right)

[Image: BT7tEeyU_o.png]

I just crop left and right. Now, the 1.78:1 frame is identical to the 1.66:1 frame but without the black bars.

1.78:1 & 1.66:1

[Image: TpnwshWx_o.jpg]
[Image: BT7tEeyU_o.png]

1.78:1 & 1.66 (Twilight Time)

[Image: c_image.php?max_height=1080&s=98516&a=0&x=0&y=0&l=0]
[Image: c_image.php?max_height=1080&s=94129&a=0&x=0&y=0&l=0]

IMHO, the 1.66:1 frame is zoomed in (see top and bottom) just to get rid of those black bars. If so, I wonder why.

Like this…

[Image: qIAV4eyh_o.png]

The result (1.78:1 zoomed in and not zoomed in)

[Image: 7Z9kbvHS_o.png]
[Image: TpnwshWx_o.jpg]

Didn't they have a full frame scan? If a full frame scan allows me to frame for 1.78:1, 1.66:1 and 1.85:1 just by cropping…

1.85:1 (the real OAR)

[Image: xu3eQEV6_o.png]

The result (black bars: top and bottom):

[Image: HFvUkgHE_o.png]

Or have they not zoomed in and they are different scans (for 1.78:1 & 1.66:1) ? That's what I'm trying to find out.

More examples, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory

UHD 4K (1.85:1):

[Image: c_preview.php?s=170783&go=1&a=0&x=0&y=0]

Blu-ray (No black bars, 1.78:1) Different framing, now we see the tie and all the mirror)

[Image: c_image.php?max_height=2160&s=170762&a=0&x=0&y=0&l=0]

Different scans? Zoom again?
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#24
(2021-09-17, 02:06 PM)Onti Wrote: [Image: c_preview.php?s=170783&go=1&a=0&x=0&y=0]

Blu-ray (No black bars, 1.78:1) Different framing, now we see the tie and all the mirror)

[Image: c_image.php?max_height=2160&s=170762&a=0&x=0&y=0&l=0]

Different scans? Zoom again?

The UHD looks like the correct framing to me.
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