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Cinavia
#1
Note I have no experience with Cinavia, but I was reading this page yesterday on the CinEX HD website. Seems Slysoft doesn't know how to remove Cinavia protection and they claim they can prove it with a file that restores Cinavia from a source "fixed" using the "mutilation" method to make the signal re-detectable.

So it seems that CinEX HD is the only program that actually removes the signal instead of simply mutilating it beyond software detection. Or at least that's what they claim, see what you think. In any case Slysoft forces transcoding the entire soundtrack to AC-3 whereas CinEX HD allows you to keep the track in the original format (although how much of it gets re-encoded isn't made clear on the web page).
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#2
(2015-07-29, 04:07 AM)Valeyard Wrote: Note I have no experience with Cinavia, but I was reading this page yesterday on the CinEX HD website. Seems Slysoft doesn't know how to remove Cinavia protection and they claim they can prove it with a file that restores Cinavia from a source "fixed" using the "mutilation" method to make the signal re-detectable.

So it seems that CinEX HD is the only program that actually removes the signal instead of simply mutilating it beyond software detection. Or at least that's what they claim, see what you think. In any case Slysoft forces transcoding the entire soundtrack to AC-3 whereas CinEX HD allows you to keep the track in the original format (although how much of it gets re-encoded isn't made clear on the web page).

I've heard that CinEX HD is pretty sketchy. They do re-encode tracks, and it downloads a massive amount of data from their servers. It is suspected that it patches in segments from pre-ripped DVD tracks... but no one is sure, they won't talk about how their software works.

Either way, the output from Slysoft and CinEX are still audibly reduced quality. In the cases of those films, you are better off syncing a DVD audio track.

Link to a list of corrupted releases and at the bottom is suggestions for dealing with Cinavia: http://blog.dvdfab.cn/cinavia-protection.html
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#3
Interesting...

http://forum.videohelp.com/threads/36280...-is-a-scam

I'm inclined to agree. It looks like either they're taking extreme steps to protect their method or their method is to have a technician "remove it" manually and send through the patched data (hence the database).

But that's no defence of Slysoft either - if they knew how the protection works properly then it should not be possible to restore it once it's been "removed".
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#4
I hate the Cinavia protection and am surprised that it has lasted as long as it has without successfully being circumvented, like all other types of protection we have seen in the past. There must be a solution that involves something other than degrading the audio or being forced to sync lossy DVD audio tracks (which won't always sync right)

Fortunately, I could care less about this as I use my PC to play everything and, as more and more people move away from stand-alone players and go towards streaming and local playing, I'm afraid to think of what the next "Cinavia" is going to beSad
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#5
There is a Foobar2000 plugin that "should" work... of course it will re-encode the audio, but I guess this is the only way to circumvent Cinavia... and AFAIK DVD tracks are affected, too - at least for some titltes.
Sadly my projects are lost due to an HDD crash... Sad
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