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Flatbed film scanner
#1
So I'm thinking of getting a flatbed film scanner for telecine work. What model would you recommend?
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#2
I'm considering getting the Epson Perfection V550, but if there's any better scanner for telecine, let me know.
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#3
Well hold that thought....

http://petapixel.com/2012/12/23/why-you-...a-scanner/

But that kind of camera would require me to shell out ten times as much! ...I need a miracle.
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#4
(2016-05-05, 08:27 PM)FrankT Wrote: Well hold that thought....

http://petapixel.com/2012/12/23/why-you-...a-scanner/

But that kind of camera would require me to shell out ten times as much! ...I need a miracle.

Uh.. great idea using a DSLR. Too bad the good ones are quite expensive. Sad only have a small one with crop sensor.
I just wonder how much time that would need. First of all shooting each frame seperatly. Would it be someway automatic with a flatbed scanner, or would it also need to process each frame?


Sorry. I would like to help with informations regarding scanner.. but that is completely out of my knowledge, I do not own anything on Film. Sad
"Never cut a deal with a dragon..."
- Old Shadowrun wisdom
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#5
Well I'm thinking using something like the Kinograph uses. CineToVidPro in particular.

Here's a piece on the flatbed telecine process.
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#6
Well, never mind. I've ordered my V550, and I'll get to test it out tomorrow. Since I don't have any expertise in circuitry I can't build an advancer for the film to go through, so I'll have to do it by hand. Which will take longer, but it's easier. Now, let's see.... anything else?
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#7
But why would you do that? A feature film is like 200000 frames and this model's fastest scanning speed is 30 seconds per frame. That's 1666 hours to scan ONE film and that doesn't include the time you'd need for advancing the frames manually, managing your output images etc. Not to mention that, unwinding the film by hand, you would inevitably scratch it up or even break it.

I don't want do be rude, but unless you're planning to use it to scan your own negatives (the photography ones, whatever they're called in English) and photos, you should cancel the purchase and save the money and trouble.
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#8
I don't really have any other choice! A proper film scanner would cost far more than I have! I'm surprised you do not share this sentiment. I have to do restoration on the cheap, like!
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#9
Why do you need this scanner anyway? Do you have some movie to scan? If that's the case then surely your money would be used better by paying a professional.
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#10
Well... it's a couple of digests.
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